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Linguistics courses
Linguistics courses: Topics courses

Other relevant courses at BU:
Linguistic analysis of specific languages
Logic and the philosophy of language
Language, culture, and society
Language acquisition
Neurological aspects of language
Topics in Linguistics courses

Linguistics Courses

CAS LX 205

Offered:
Fall 2014

The Origins of Writing
This course is about the origin and development of Greek and Roman alphabets, presented against a panorama of many writing systems used across the globe; it has a considerable linguistic component supplemented by historical information about various languages and cultures.
[No prerequisites]

CAS LX 235

Not in current schedule.

Language in the Contemporary World: Technology, Society, and the Law
Exploration of the role of human language in a range of activities and endeavors, focusing on issues of technology, governmental policy, education, gender roles, legal language, language crimes, and the use of language in both media and politics to shape perceptions.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2009

CAS LX 240

Not in current schedule.

Great Linguists
Introduction to linguistics through writings of important linguists, including Descartes, Saussure, Sapir, Jespersen, Bloomfield, and Chomsky. Students read original works and write short essays. Lectures and discussion place readings in the tradition of structural linguistics, within a broad humanistic context.
[No prerequisites]
Has not been offered in recent years.

CAS LX 245

Not in current schedule.

Language and Mind
Foundations of linguistics as a science, in relation to cognitive science, philosophy, and psychology, including a critical overview of the research program initiated by Noam Chomsky. Specific questions that we will consider include: what exactly is a language--a set of utterances, a set of sentences, a set of cognitive abilities? Do humans possess an innate "instinct" to acquire a language? How are our linguistic abilities realized in the brain? Does the language we speak determine the structure and content of our thoughts? Is language a uniquely human ability? Students read and discuss original works, and write short essays.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2010, Fall 2012

CAS LX 250

Offered:
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016

Introduction to Linguistics (Offered every semester.)
Study of the fundamental properties that all languages share, and of how languages differ, with respect to structure (sound system, word formation, syntax), expression of meaning, acquisition, variation, and change; cultural and artistic uses of languages; comparison of oral, written, and signed languages.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

CAS LX 320

Offered:
Fall 2015

Language, Race, and Gender
Do women talk differently from men? How do race and ethnicity relate to the way people use language? This course examines these inter-related questions from the perspective of modern sociolinguistic theory, analyzing a range of languages and communities throughout the world.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2014

CAS LX 340

Not in current schedule.

Language Myths
Exploration of several widespread misconceptions about language and its use, developing students' abilities to evaluate these critically from the perspective of linguistic theory. Topics include: multilingualism and linguistic diversity; language and the law; language "decay"; and prescriptive vs. descriptive grammar.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2011

CAS LX 400

Not in current schedule.

Second Language Acquisition
An overview of linguistic research on second language acquisition. Different theories of second language acquisition will be discussed; special attention will be paid to differences between first and second language acquisition, as well as implications of research for foreign language teaching.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

CAS LX 406

Offered:
Spring 2015
Spring 2016

The Linguistics of Contemporary English
Systematic introduction to the linguistic analysis of modern English (phonology, morphology, syntax) from the perspective of generative grammar. Other topics include: English and its West Germanic relatives, non-standard varieties and the development of standard English, varieties of World Englishes. [Note that this will count as a course in the linguistic analysis of a specific language for purposes of satisfying requirements for the Linguistics major.]
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2013

CAS LX 501

Offered:
Spring 2015
Spring 2016

Linguistic Field Methods
An in-depth investigation of the phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and lexicon of an African or other non-Indo-European language. Weekly sessions with language consultant.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013

CAS LX 502

Offered:
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016

Semantics I (To be offered every semester.)
Semantics is the study of linguistic meaning. In this course, we will examine meaning from a variety of perspectives, including: how it is encoded in words and sentences, how native speakers interpret language, and how truth and falsehood can emerge from the complexity of the grammar. We will also touch on various aspects of pragmatics - the function of meaning in a communicative setting.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013, Spring 2014, Fall 2013

CAS LX 503

Offered:
Fall 2015

Semantics II (Normally offered at least every other year in the fall.)
Introduction to the semantics of natural language at an intermediate level. Topics include (but are not limited to) predication and quantification, scope and anaphora, problems of discourse analysis, various issues at the interface of semantics and pragmatics, and crosslinguistic semantics.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 502 Semantics I or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2010, Fall 2013

CAS LX 504

Offered:
Fall 2014

Topics in Pragmatics (Normally offered at least every other year in the fall.)
Covers the main areas of linguistic pragmatics, the study of language use and the relation between meaning and context. We will study pragmatic phenomena such as presuppositions, implicatures, anaphora, and focus, from the perspective of linguistic semantics.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 502 Semantics I or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2008, Fall 2010, Fall 2012

CAS LX 505

Not in current schedule.

Structure of African Languages
African language structure and status from the perspectives of theoretical and comparative linguistics, typology, and sociolinguistics (language and society, endangerment). Evolution of the four-phyla genetic classification system, emphasizing the high language density Niger-Congo phylum. Includes student research projects.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

CAS LX 510

Offered:
Fall 2014
Fall 2015
Spring 2016

Phonetics (Normally offered in the fall.)
Introduction to phonetic and phonological theory at an elementary level. Transcription and production of sounds, International Phonetic Alphabet, the anatomy and physiology of speech, speech acoustics, phonological rules, analysis of data from a variety of languages.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

CAS LX 513

Offered:
Fall 2014
Fall 2015

Phonology (Normally offered at least every other year in the spring.)
Introduction to the sound system of language. Study and analysis of physical and mental aspects of sound production in speech and the system in which sounds are organized. Phonological rules, processes, and universals are examined through consideration of various languages.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 510 Phonetics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Spring 2012, Fall 2013

CAS LX 515

Offered:
Fall 2014

Languages in Contact: The high stakes of grammatical border-crossing
Examines the mechanisms and outcomes of language contact by surveying cases around the globe from the past and present. Topics include lexical-borrowing, code-switching, pidgins and creoles, language death, and the emergence of entirely new linguistic systems.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 517

Not in current schedule.

"Having" and "Being" across Languages ([New course - approval pending])
Languages differ startlingly in how they express the apparently basic concepts of “possession” and “essence”. Students explore this variety and its implications, addressing fundamental questions about linguistic relativism, language universals, and the relationship between structure and meaning.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

CAS LX 518

Not in current schedule.

Focus
Exploration of focus in natural language, integrating syntax, phonology, semantics, morphology, and pragmatics in pursuit of a general understanding of both the phenomena and the ways in which different aspects of linguistic knowledge cooperate in its expression.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2011

CAS LX 519

Offered:
Fall 2015

Questions
Exploration of question formation across languages, and from several theoretical perspectives, integrating syntax, phonology, semantics, morphology, pragmatics, and philosophy in pursuit of a general understanding of one of the central phenomena in theoretical linguistics.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 521

Offered:
Fall 2014
Spring 2016

Morphology
Morphology, the study of the internal structure and the shapes of words across languages, straddles the boundary between syntax and phonology. Introduction to major issues in the study of morphology, emphasizing links to other components of grammar.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Spring 2013

CAS LX 522

Offered:
Fall 2014
Spring 2015
Fall 2015
Spring 2016

Syntax I (To be offered every semester.)
Introduction to the logical structure and organization of language, and to generative theory. Application of principles of syntactic analysis to students' own and other languages through data-oriented problems from different language types. The Wednesday section meetings (also led by Byron Ahn) offer an opportunity for interactive discussions and practice before students work on their own.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

CAS LX 523

Offered:
Fall 2014

Syntax II (Normally offered at least every other year in the spring.)
Investigation of a variety of syntactic patterns from a range of languages. Phenomena to be explored include: word order, subjects, passives, and reflexives. The second half of the course focuses on the relationship between syntax and phonology, considering, for example: syntactic vs. phonological phrases, phrasal stress, and phonological influences on syntax. Strong emphasis on reasoning abilities and forming logical arguments for or against possible analyses of the data. The Wednesday section meetings (also led by Byron Ahn) offer an opportunity for interactive discussions and practice before students work on their own.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 522 Syntax I or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2010, Spring 2012, Spring 2013

CAS LX 525

Offered:
Spring 2016

Prosody (To be offered at least every other year in the spring.)
Exploration of the melodic and rhythmic aspects of the languages of the world. Emphasis on theoretical and experimental approaches to cross-linguistic typology. Specific topics include: syllables and syllable-weight, rhythm and speech timing; stress and metrics; tone and intonation.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 510 Phonetics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

CAS LX 530

Offered:
Fall 2015

Variation in English Dialects ([New course - approval pending])
Exploration of how dialects of English differ from each other, focusing on grammatical variation in the US, with occasional forays into British dialects. Students come to appreciate how linguists investigate grammatical diversity scientifically, revealing the complex structure of non-standard dialects.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 532

Offered:
Fall 2015

Romance Linguistics ([New course - approval pending])
Covers sound and morphosyntactic change since Latin, plus various topics in the comparative grammar of modern Romance languages. Students deepen their linguistic knowledge and analytic skills by applying what they have learned in other Linguistics courses to this language family.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor; PLUS prior study of some Romance language at the 4th semester level or higher (e.g., CAS LF 212 or CAS LI 212 or CAS LS 212 or CAS LP 212 or equivalent).

CAS LX 533

Not in current schedule.

Creole Linguistics
Overview of pidginization and creolization. Evolution, typology, and area characteristics of creole languages. Role of contact languages and other substrata. Field and classroom research with creole language speakers.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2013

CAS LX 535

Offered:
Spring 2015

Historical and Comparative Linguistics (Normally offered in the spring.)
Introduction to language change and the methodology of historical linguistic analysis, using data from a wide array of languages. Investigates genetic relatedness among languages, language comparison, historical reconstruction, and patterns and principles of change in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2009, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012

CAS LX 540

Offered:
Spring 2016

Acquisition of Syntax
A general introduction to the study of first and second language acquisition within the framework of generative grammar, focused on the development of syntax. Topics include: the development of syntactic structure, verb movement, finiteness, null subjects, binding, and questions.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2012, Fall 2012

CAS LX 541

Offered:
Fall 2015

Phonological Development ([New course - approval pending])
Surveys current knowledge about how children acquire phonology during the first years of life. Topics include biological foundations; perceptual and vocal development; word learning; phonological universals; implicit and explicit learning mechanisms; formalist and functionalist models; and individual variation.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 542

Offered:
Fall 2015

Second Language Acquisition ([New course - approval pending])
Overview of second language acquisition at all linguistic levels. Topics include the role of the native language; markedness; universals; environmental variables; cognitive and affective factors; social dimensions; individual differences among learners; and application of theory to third language acquisition.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 545

Offered:
Spring 2016

Bilingualism ([New course - approval pending])
The psycholinguistics and sociolinguistics of life with two languages. Topics include bilingual language use, processing, acquisition, organization; effects of bilingualism on cognition and development; the bilingual brain; the bilingual speech community; bilingual education; bilingualism in the media and public eye.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.

CAS LX 546

Not in current schedule.

Incomplete Acquisition and Language Attrition ([New course - approval pending])
Examines native language knowledge and change in speakers who have become dominant in another language. Topics include differences among heritage speakers, international adoptees, and adult second language learners; language change in expatriates; and environmental and affective factors conditioning language loss.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

GRS LX 700

Not in current schedule.

Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theory
After a general introduction to the study of language acquisition within the principles and parameters framework of generative grammar, defining the central concepts and laying out some of the theoretical issues, a number of topics will be discussed, including: the status of functional categories, verb movement and finiteness, null subjects, binding theory, and wh-questions. The first part of the course will focus on first language acquisition; the latter part on second language acquisition.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 522 or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007

GRS LX 865

Not in current schedule.

Advanced Topics in Linguistic Theory: Language Acquisition
An in-depth exploration of current issues in language acquisition in relation to recent developments in linguistic theory, making use of computer-based tools and techniques in hands-on lab work. The focus is on experimental methodology and statistics, analysis of transcripts to uncover generalizations and test theoretical predictions, and use of other psycholinguistic tools. Topics to be covered will be drawn, in part, from the recent programs of the annual Boston University Conference on Language Development.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 522 or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.
 
Linguistics Courses: Topics Courses
Topics vary by semester, and may be taken more than once with different topics. Current and recent offerings are listed below.

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Language Acquisition
A general introduction to the study of first and second language acquisition within the framework of generative grammar, focused on the development of syntax. Topics include: the status and development of functional categories, verb-movement, finiteness, null subjects, binding, and questions.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 522 Syntax I
Recently offered: Fall 2008

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Universals of Language
Survey of a range of characteristics that differentiate possible from impossible human languages, which inform modern understanding of the human language capacity. Discussion will center on readings presenting different perspectives on issues of typology, modalities, acquisition, variation, change, and creolization.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250
Recently offered: Fall 2010

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Language Acquisition (Now offered as CAS LX 518)
A general introduction to theoretical study of first and second language acquisition, focusing mainly on the development of syntax. Topics will include tense and agreement, word order, and constraints on pronoun use, as well as lexical semantics and discourse constraints.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2010

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Negation
An examination of the diverse strategies for expressing negation in natural languages (cf. not, no one, un- in English). Topics include: negation and scope, polarity items/concord, antynomy and reversal, and morphosyntactic variety in the expression of negation.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2010

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Focus
Exploration of linguistic focus from several perspectives. Developing a theoretical understanding of how languages signal focus through syntax and intonation, and how focus interacts with semantics and pragmatics, we examine how diverse aspects of language knowledge interact as a system.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2009

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Questions
Exploration of a central issue in theoretical linguistics, the typology of question formation across languages, from several perspectives. Syntactic universals and variation, semantic interpretation and discourse effects, and intonational effects will be brought to bear in developing a theoretical understanding.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2009

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Acquisition of Semantics and Pragmatics
How does a child acquire an adult grammar, and the ability to interpret words and complex phrases? This course examines the acquisition of meaning, both the literal meaning of words and phrases and their implied meaning in conversation.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 or equivalent
Recently offered: Spring 2009

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Mood and Modality
Modality expresses the possibility or necessity of a situation: 'John may/must be at home.' This course investigates types of modality and ways in which modality is encoded in the grammar in mood and modal systems across languages.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250.
Recently offered: Fall 2008

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Number
Number is sometimes defined as the category marking the opposition between singular and plural. This greatly underestimates its role in the grammar. This course examines number systems in a variety of languages from morphological, syntactic, semantic, and pragmatic perspectives.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 or equivalent.
Recently offered: Spring 2008

CAS LX 500

Offered:
Spring 2015

Topics in Linguistics: Melodies of English (and some other languages)
Exploration and analysis of English melodic patterns. Students transcribe and even gather prosodic data (intonation, grouping, and prominence), using computer software and the ToBI framework. Comparisons of the English intonational system to systems of other languages of the world.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 510 Phonetics or consent of instructor

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theory
A general introduction to the study of first and second language acquisition within the framework of generative grammar. The course will cover theoretical approaches to syntactic, semantic, and phonological development, reviewing studies and methodologies both classic and current.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2013

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: The Linguistics of Contemporary English
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2012

CAS LX 500

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Linguistics: The Evolution of Language
Examines the evolution of the language faculty in the human species. Compares and contrasts language with other forms of animal communication. Explores and evaluates findings and claims from paleontology, biology, archaeology, anthropology, linguistics, and cognitive science.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor
Recently offered: Fall 2012

CAS LX 500

Offered:
Spring 2015

Topics in Linguistics: "Having" and "being" across Languages
Languages differ startlingly in how they express the apparently basic concepts of “possession” and “essence”. Students explore this variety and its implications, addressing fundamental questions about linguistic relativism, language universals, and the relationship between structure and meaning.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor

CAS LX 500

Offered:
Fall 2014

Topics in Linguistics: Variation in English Dialects
Exploration of how dialects of English differ from each other, focusing on grammatical variation in the US, with occasional forays into British dialects. Students come to appreciate how linguists investigate grammatical diversity scientifically, revealing the complex structure of non-standard dialects.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor
Other Relevant Courses at BU
Linguistic analysis of specific languages

CAS EN 513

Not in current schedule.

Modern English Grammar
A systematic analysis of English, applied to the reading of literature and the writing of essays.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Spring 2011

CAS EN 515

Not in current schedule.

History of the English Language I
How do the social and cultural experiences of young adults contribute to development of the English language? Examination of how, from Old English to current times, they learned and changed their native tongue at home, in schools, and neighborhoods.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2007, Fall 2008

CAS EN 516

Not in current schedule.

History of the English Language II
Dryden said that few in England could read Chaucer. How did English change radically in three hundred years, from 1400 to 1700? Social, cultural, and linguistic dynamics of this change. [CAS EN 515 is not a prerequisite for CAS EN 516.]
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2009, Fall 2010

CAS EN 518

Offered:
Fall 2014

Linguistic Problems in TESOL
Application of linguistic concepts to the teaching of English as a foreign language. Includes description of contemporary English grammatical structures that pose problems for learners and teachers.
Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

CAS LF 500

Offered:
Spring 2016

French Phonetics
(Conducted in French) Students work to improve their own pronunciation through study of the distribution and articulation of French sounds, liaison, "mute e" and intonation. Written exercises and phonetic transcription reinforce theoretical points. An individualized program of language lab exercises is designed for each student on the basis of a diagnostic test. Regular pronunciation exercises include memorization of short dialogs and poetry readings.
    Required texts :
    (1) Carduner et Hagiwara, D'Accord - La Prononciation du français internationale: Acquisition et perfectionnement, ISBN-10: 0471097292; ISBN-13: 978-0471097297 (can be purchased over the Internet);
    and, ordered through Schoenhof's:
    (2) Baudelaire, Les fleurs du mal.
    (3) Ionesco, La cantatrice chauve et La leçon.
For more detailed description of course coverage and aims, see course home page.

Prerequisite: CAS LF 303 and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2013

CAS LF 502

Not in current schedule.

The Structure of French: Syntax
(Conducted in French) After an introduction to some of the main features of the sentence structure of French (with occasional excursions into Quebecois), attention will be focused on a number of specific topics in French syntax: e.g., the position of the finite and non-finite verb, formation of questions and relative clauses, different types of subject-verb inversion, quantifier floating and the position of subjects, negation, the behavior of clitic pronouns, imperative and causative constructions, right and left dislocation, as well as the relationship between specific syntactic constructions and intonation.
  • The class will be "hands-on", with sets of data presented for students to analyze and reflect upon (in class and in homework assignments).
  • Readings will include articles by the most interesting and influential French linguists.
  • Students will also engage in independent lilbrary research on a topic of interest.
Prerequisite: CAS LF 303 and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2014

CAS LF 503

Offered:
Spring 2015

The Structure of French: Phonology
(Conducted in French) Students study the organization of the sound system of standard French. Quebecois and Haitian creole will be considered briefly. Questions about the mental representation of linguistic information, processes of word formation and language variation and change will be discussed. Frequent problem sets will allow students to discover linguistic regularities.
Prerequisite: CAS LF 303 and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2010

CAS LF 504

Not in current schedule.

History of the French Language
(Conducted in French) Prosodic, phonetic, and morphosyntactic changes from Classical Latin to Modern French, highlighting the common roots between French and other Romance languages. Lexical influences (Gaulish, Frankish, etc.). Comparative linguistic study of texts in Old or Middle French. Sociopolitical events in the history of the French language. Standardization, linguistic unification of France after the Revolution, and the worldwide spread of the language.

Changements prosodiques, phonétiques, et morphosyntaxiques du latin classique au français moderne, mettant en relief les racines communes qui unissent le français aux autres langues romanes. Influences lexicales (gaulois, francique, etc.). Comparaison linguistique de textes en ancien ou moyen français. Evénements sociopolitiques dans l'histoire de la langue. Standardisation, unification linguistique de la France après la Révolution, et diffusion du français dans le monde.
Prerequisite: CAS LF 303 and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2011

CAS LF/LX 506

Not in current schedule.

Topics in French Linguistics: Parlers francais d'Amerique du Nord (French dialects of North America)
(Conducted in French) Population history and demography. Dialectal divisions. Phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical features. French in Quebec, Acadia, NY/New England, Missouri, and Louisiana. Hypotheses on the genesis of certain dialects. Analysis of certain Creole features (Haitian, Louisiana, Lesser Antilles) from a comparative perspective.
Prerequisite: CAS LF 303 and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2012

CAS LG 315

Offered:
Spring 2015

Introduction to German Linguistics (Every other year)
(Conducted in English) Introduction to major subfields of German linguistics: phonetics/phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, historical linguistics, regional variation, and sociolinguistic aspects such as gender and English influence. Includes familiarization with Middle High German. Course also aims to improve students’ German proficiency and pronunciation.
Prerequisite: CAS LG 211 or equivalent proficiency

CAS LJ 410

Not in current schedule.

The History of the Japanese Language
(Conducted in English) Overview of major issues in the history of Japanese: genetic relationships, changes in sound system, word and sentence structures, and pragmatics. Special attention to the process leading to the current writing system. Representative texts used to demonstrate different literary languages.
Prerequisite: CAS LJ 211.
Recently offered: Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Fall 2010

CAS LJ 510

Offered:
Spring 2015

Structure of the Japanese Language: Syntax
(Conducted in English) Introduction to Japanese syntax, covering a range of topics including word order, information structure, questions, types of verbs, demonstratives, anaphora, and relative clauses. Close study of Japanese data will also form the basis for comparisons with English and other languages. Lectures and discussions in English with bilingual materials.
Prerequisite: LX 250 and LJ 112 or 123 (or equivalent placement in Japanese); or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2013, Spring 2014

CAS LS 504

Not in current schedule.

History of the Spanish Language
(Conducted in Spanish) Study of the structure of sounds, general concepts of language change, and specific phonological, morphological and syntactic changes in the history of Spanish. Begins with the modern language and proceeds to successively earlier stages; includes reading of representative medieval and dialectal texts.
Prerequisite: CAS LS 350 plus two CAS LS 400-level literature courses
Recently offered: Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2013

CAS LS 505

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Spanish Linguistics: The Sounds of Spanish
(Conducted in Spanish) Introduction to Spanish phonetics and phonology. Covers articulatory, acoustic, and auditory phonetics, focusing on techniques for visualizing speech sounds. Examines the phonemic inventory and phonological organization of Spanish from several perspectives, including generative and articulatory phonology as well as sociolinguistics.
Prerequisite: CAS LS 303 and CAS LX 250
Recently offered: Fall 2012

CAS LS/LX 420

Not in current schedule.

Spanish in the United States
(Conducted in Spanish) An ethnographic survey and sociolinguistic analysis of the Spanish language as it is spoken in urban USA. The course will focus on issues of language and dialect contact, language change, the fraught notion of 'heritage' speakers, and also code-switching as a sociolinguistic phenomenon.
Prerequisite: CAS LS 212 and CAS LX 250
Recently offered: Fall 2013

CAS LS/LX 507

Offered:
Fall 2014
Fall 2015

The Sounds of Spanish (every fall)
(Conducted in Spanish) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the linguistic analysis of speech, with a focus on the Spanish language. We examine the vowels and consonants of Spanish from the perspective of articulatory and acoustic phonetics. In addition, the course introduces core concepts in phonological analysis, surveying the phonemic inventory and phonological organization of Spanish. We also investigate a range of regional variation demonstrated by so-called ‘dialects’ of Spanish, with an emphasis on the historical and social significance of such variation in Spain, Latin America, and the United States. In summary, this course aims to examine the sounds of Spanish as physical, mental, and social phenomena.
Prerequisite: CAS LS 303 and CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor
Recently offered: Fall 2013

CAS LS/LX 508

Offered:
Spring 2015
Spring 2016

The Structure of Spanish (every spring)
(Conducted in Spanish) The goal of this course is to introduce students to the structure of the Spanish language, with a focus on its morphology and syntax. We examine the internal structure of words and the inflectional and derivational processes that constrain them. In addition, the course introduces key concepts such as morpheme, affix, grammatical class, linguistic gender, nominalization, and verbalization. We also investigate fundamental principles of syntactic theory and analysis, with an emphasis on the hierarchical relationships among words at the phrasal level. We use naturalistic speech data, collected from around the Spanish-speaking world, to critically examine key assumptions and tools of contemporary syntactic theory, including X-bar theory, binary branching, thematic role assignment, and the concept of the sentence. We give special attention the notion of ungrammaticality as it relates to syntactic and morphological variation and change.
Prerequisite: CAS LS 303 and CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor
Recently offered: Spring 2014, Spring 2013

SED DE 672

Not in current schedule.

Structure of American Sign Language
Structural linguistic study of specific aspects of phonology, morphology, syntax, and lexicology in ASL. Concepts of language variation, dialect, creolization, and bilingualism.
Prerequisite: SED LS 560, LS 571, and LS 602.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2013

Also relating to linguistic analysis of specific languages:
CAS LX 406 The Linguistics of Contemporary English
CAS LX 500 Topics in Linguistics: Variation in English Dialects

Logic and the philosophy of language

CAS PH 160

Offered:
Fall 2014

Reasoning and Argumentation
A systematic study of the principles of both deductive and informal reasoning, calculated to enhance students' actual reasoning skills, with an emphasis on reasoning and argumentation in ordinary discourse.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Spring 2010, Fall 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013, Fall 2013, Spring 2014

CAS PH 261

Offered:
Fall 2014

Puzzles and Paradoxes
Some of our most basic beliefs, when scrutinized, lead to absurd conclusions. For example, using only beliefs that seem uncontroversial, we can conclude that motion is impossible, that everyone is bald, and that it is impossible to give a surprise exam. Carefully scrutinizing the reasoning that leads to these absurdities often yields substantial philosophical insight. This course examines a number of such puzzles and paradoxes in detail.
Prerequisite: CAS PH 160 or consent of instructor
Recently offered: Fall 2012, Fall 2013

CAS PH 360

Not in current schedule.

Logic
Study of the basics of modern logic, including propositional logic, quantifiers, identity and functions, completeness and incompleteness. A special emphasis is placed on strategies of deductive reasoning.
Prerequisite: one philosophy course or sophomore standing.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Fall 2012, Spring 2013

CAS PH 421

Not in current schedule.

Frege, Moore, and Russell
An in-depth reading of several works by Russell.
Prerequisite: CAS PH 310 History of Modern Philosophy and two other philosophy courses, or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2008, Fall 2010

CAS PH 463

Not in current schedule.

Philosophy of Language
Critical survey of the main issues in the philosophy of language and the foundations of linguistics, including the ideas of logical form and the universality of languages as well as the basic ideas of generative grammar, possible-worlds semantics, Wittgenstein, and speech-act theories.
Prerequisite: Prerequisites: CAS PH 310 and CAS PH 360.
Recently offered: Fall 2007, Fall 2009

CAS PH 486

Not in current schedule.

Topics in Knowledge, Language, and Logic
This course will focus on new approaches to logic and language theory, as well as their impact on epistemology.
Prerequisite: any one philosophy course from CAS PH 460-468, or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Fall 2010
Language, culture, and society

CAS AN 351

Offered:
Fall 2014

Language, Culture, and Society
Introduction to basic concepts, problems, and methods used by anthropologists in the investigation of relationships among language, culture, and society. Topics include language and conceptual systems, language and role, language and social context, and language and thought.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2011, Fall 2010, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

CAS AN 521

Not in current schedule.

Introduction to Sociolinguistics
Sociolinguistics, broadly construed, is the investigation of relations between linguistic phenomena and human social life. This course covers several recent theoretical approaches to the study of language and society: variational sociolinguistics, ethnography of communication, and international sociolinguistics. Also covered are development of pidgins and creoles, multilingualism, language choice, and other aspects of language and culture.
Prerequisite: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010

CAS AN 524

Not in current schedule.

Seminar: Language and Culture Contacts in Contemporary Africa
Concepts and theoretical approaches to study language variation and change in sociolinguistics/linguistic anthropology. This course examines internal and external factors that trigger language variations and changes and the social attitudes associated with them. The nexus between diachronic and synchronic changes will also be reanalyzed in light of the Labovian variationist model. While the course will focus on language variations and changes in Africa, it will draw from existing literature to provide students with a strong foundation on the scholarship in the field of contact linguistics, language variation and change, types of variations, the relationships between these variations and gender, ethnicity, religion, youth culture, and globalization. It will conclude by introducing students to the new field of forensic linguistics (the interface between language, crime and law). Using actual cases from the US and Europe, the use of linguistic features as evidence in criminal investigations, in authorship disputes, and in asylum cases will be examined. The course will consist of lectures and class discussions, practical exercises dealing with issues on language variation and change and their various implications in the 21st century. The course will provide students with the tools necessary to plan and execute studies on language variation and change in the world's speech communities.
Prerequisite: CAS AN 351 or consent of instructor
Recently offered: Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

CAS AN 532

Not in current schedule.

Literacy and Islam in Africa
Ajami comes from the Arabic word for non-Arab, or foreigner. It also refers to the practice of writing other languages using a modified Arabic script. Although written records are rarely regarded as part of sub-Saharan Africa’s intellectual heritage, important bodies of Ajami materials have existed in numerous communities in Africa for centuries. In South Africa, Muslim Malay slaves produced the first written record of Afrikaans in Ajami. Africa’s Ajami traditions developed in communities with a long history of practicing Islam, and who sought to adapt the Arabic alphabet to their own tongues, first for religious purposes such as prayers, writing magical protective devices, and disseminating religious materials and edicts, and later for secular functions such as commercial and administrative record-keeping, writing eulogies and family genealogies, recording important events such as births, deaths and weddings, and writing biographies, poetry, political satires, advertisements, road signs, public announcements, speeches, and personal correspondence. The course will examine both major and minor African Ajami traditions. It will investigate (1) the Islamization of Africa and the subsequent development of Ajami literary traditions in the continent, (2) the forms, contents, and goals of Ajami materials, (3) their role in the spread of Islam and the reverse effect of African influences on Islam, (4) the past and current secular functions of Ajami materials, and (5) the Arabic and Ajami materials written by enslaved Africans in the Americas. The primary goal of this course is to enable students to have access to the unique sources of knowledge generally missed in the studies on Africa written in Arabic and European languages, and to provide them with a deeper understanding of the spread of Islam and its Africanization in the continent. The course will open new research opportunities for students interested in the histories and traditions of sub-Saharan African Muslim communities.
Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor
Recently offered: Fall 2013

CAS AN 555

Not in current schedule.

Evolution of Brain Language
Current issues in human brain evolution research and theories of the origins and neurological basis for human language abilities. Topics: animal communication, brain size evolution, intelligence theories, innateness debate, brain and vocal tract anatomy, and dual inheritance theories.
Prerequisite: AN331 or consent of instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

CAS AR 208

Not in current schedule.

Lost Languages and Decipherments
An overview of the archaeology of writing focusing on modern decipherments of ancient texts. Related topics include characteristics of the world's major language families, the nature of linguistic change, and the origin and history of the alphabet.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2010, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

CAS SO 413

Not in current schedule.

Sociology of Language and Communication
Approaches to the study of social interaction. Theoretical and methodological perspectives from Goffman to Sacks and conversation analysis. Students undertake supervised research studies of audio and video recordings of naturally occurring interaction.
Prerequisite: SO 203 or consent of the instructor.
Has not been offered in recent years.

Also relating to language, culture, and society:
CAS LX 515 Languages in Contact: The high stakes of grammatical border-crossing

Language acquisition

CAS PS 545

Not in current schedule.

Language Development
Language development in children. The acquisition of phonological, morphological, and syntactic systems; the role of both parent and child in the acquisition of communicative competence.
Prerequisite: CAS PS 241, PS 243, or consent of instructor.
Recently offered: Fall 2007

SED LS 566

Not in current schedule.

Language Acquisition
Overview of language acquisition in typical, atypical, and second language learners. Topic areas include phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, pragmatics, child-directed speech, the role of cognitive development, and theories of language acquisition. Students will apply course material during weekly observations of a language learner, and in a data analysis project.
Prerequisite: CAS LX250, SED LS565, or equivalent.
Has not been offered in recent years.

Also relating to language acquisition:
CAS LX 500 Topics in Linguistics: Language Acquisition
GRS LX 700 Language Acquisition and Linguistic Theory
GRS LX 865 Advanced Topics in Linguistic Theory: Language Acquisition

Neurological aspects of language

CAS PS 544

Offered:
Fall 2014

Developmental Neuropsychology
Study of the neural mechanisms underlying behavioral development. Topics include the plasticity of the developing brain in response to deprivation or damage and mechanisms underlying specific syndromes (e.g., aphasia, dyslexia, learning disabilities, hyperactivity, autism, and Tourette's syndrome).
Prerequisite: consent of instructor
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Spring 2009, Spring 2010

SAR SH 505

Offered:
Spring 2015

Introduction to Phonological Disorders
This course provides an overview of current models of normal and disordered phonological development. Students examine and practice evidenced-based principles and practical applications of assessment, analysis, diagnosis, and remediation approaches and procedures to facilitate critical thinking and problem-solving abilities to apply to working with individuals with a variety of phonological disorders.
Prerequisite: SAR SH 521 and SH 524
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Spring 2009, Spring 2011, Spring 2013, Spring 2014

SAR SH 523

Offered:
Fall 2014

Introduction to Speech Science
Lecture, laboratory, and demonstrations. Introduction to the basic physics of sound, including the decibel scale, spectral analysis, and sound resonance. Acoustic theory of speech production. Effects of contact on speech acoustics. Suprasegmental characteristics of speech production. Introduction to speech perception.
Prerequisite: SAR SH 521
Recently offered: Spring 2007, Spring 2008, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013

SAR SH 524

Not in current schedule.

Language Acquisition
This course will focus on first language acquisition in infancy and childhood. We will cover the progression of language development in each of the traditional areas of linguistic analysis: phonology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics. The course will be focused on experimental research in typical language acquisition and on different theories that strive to explain the underlying cognitive and linguistic mechanisms at work in an early learner.
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2006, Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Spring 2013

SAR SH 531

Offered:
Fall 2014

Introduction to Communication Disorders
Introduction to various speech and language disorders found across linguistically and culturally diverse populations. Characteristics underlying biological systems and methods for evaluation and treating a variety or communication disorders are examined. Exploration of the professions of speech pathology and audiology
[No prerequisites]
Recently offered: Fall 2007, Fall 2008, Fall 2009, Fall 2010, Fall 2011, Fall 2012, Fall 2013, Spring 2014