Fall 2018 (tentative)

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Linguistics courses
Course number Course title Section Instructor Days Time Room

CAS LX 110

SAY WHAT ? Accents, Dialects, and Society

A1 Myler TR 9:30-10:45 TBA
When people from different regions of the US and from various parts of the English-speaking world meet for the first time, they are immediately struck by differences in the way they speak. For speakers of so-called “non-standard” dialects, this can give rise to insecurity and frustration, and dialect prejudice may lead such speakers to suppress aspects of their native variety (an experience familiar to many American college students). But is there any objective reason to consider non-standard dialects as inferior? What are the implications of dialect diversity for education, civil rights, and other aspects of public policy? How are dialects and their speakers represented in literature, film, humor, music, and other aspects of popular culture? How exactly does English vary across different places and social groups? Where do these accents and dialects come from in the first place? This course, which assumes no previous background in linguistics, investigates these questions from both a linguistic and a more broadly humanistic perspective. [Prereq: None. Students who have already taken CAS LX 250 or any higher-level linguistics course (or are doing so concurrently) are not eligible to take CAS LX 110.]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS LX 250

Introduction to Linguistics

A1 Barnes TR 2-3:15 TBA
S1 TBA F 9:05-9:55 TBA
S2 TBA F 10:10-11 TBA
S3 TBA F 11:15-12:05 TBA
S4 TBA F 12:20-1:10 TBA
S5 TBA F 2:30-3:20 TBA
S6 TBA F 9:05-9:55 TBA
S7 TBA F 11:15-12:05 TBA
S8 TBA F 2:30-3:20 TBA
Study of the fundamental properties that all languages share, and of how languages differ, with respect to structure (sound system, word formation, syntax), expression of meaning, acquisition, variation, and change; cultural and artistic uses of languages; comparison of oral, written, and signed languages. [Prereq: none]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • Students signing up for CAS LX 250 A1 should also sign up for one of the Friday discussion sections.

CAS LX 301

Phonetics & Phonology: Introduction to Sound Systems

A1 Chang MWF 10:10-11 TBA
Introduction to the nature and patterning of sounds in human language. Presents articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and basic phonological analysis, focusing on cross-language typology and comparison. Hands-on development of practical skills, including IPA transcription, field techniques, and digital speech analysis. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 601; Previously offered as CAS LX 510 "Phonetics"]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS LX 321

Syntax: Introduction to Sentential Structure

A1 Hagstrom TR 3:30-4:45 TBA
Introduction to syntax as an object of inquiry. Students build an increasingly sophisticated model of syntactic knowledge to account for data from English and other languages, constructing and evaluating alternative hypotheses about how sentence structure works. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 621; Previously offered as CAS LX 522 "Syntax I"]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS LX 359

Interrupted Acquisition and Language Attrition

A1 Chang MWF 12:20-1:10 TBA
Examines native language knowledge and change in speakers who have become dominant in another language. Topics include differences among heritage speakers, international adoptees, and adult second language learners; language change in expatriates; and environmental and affective factors conditioning language loss. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 659; Previously offered as CAS LX 546 "Incomplete Acquisition and Language Attrition"]

CAS LX 360

Historical and Comparative Linguistics

A1 Nikolaev TR 2:00-3:15 TBA
Introduction to language change and the methodology of historical linguistic analysis, using data from a wide array of languages. Investigates genetic relatedness among languages, language comparison, historical reconstruction, and patterns and principles of change in phonology, morphology, syntax, and semantics. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 660; Previously offered as CAS LX 535 "Historical and Comparative Linguistics"]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS LX 365

Variation in Dialects of English

A1 Myler TR 12:30-1:45 TBA
This course explores how dialects of English differ from each other, focusing on grammatical variation in the US, with occasional forays into British dialects. The class will examine grammatical diversity on a number of levels (including accents, dialectal vocabulary, and social factors in language variation), but the main focus will be on studying and accounting for morphosyntactic differences amongst varieties. Students come to appreciate how linguists investigate grammatical diversity scientifically, revealing the complex structure of non-standard dialects. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 665; Also offered as CAS EN 313; Previously offered as CAS LX 530 "Variation in Dialects of English"]

CAS LX 373

The Structure of French: Phonology

A1 Neidle TR 9:30-10:45 TBA
(Conducted in French) The sound system of standard French, with exploration of dialect variation in France, Canada, and other Francophone regions of the world. Questions about mental representation of linguistic information, processes of word formation, and language variation and change. Students discover linguistic regularities through frequent problem sets.
  • Learn how different sounds are produced, and how they fit into the overall phonological system of the French language.
  • Discover ways in which your own pronunciation of French may deviate from that of native speakers, to improve your pronunciation.
  • Explore the kinds of phonological changes have occurred in the evolution of French, as well as the kinds of phonological differences that account for dialectal variations.
  • Reflect upon questions concerning the mental representation of linguistic information, and formulate and evaluate arguments in favor of specific hypotheses.
[Prereq: One French course at the CAS LF 300 level or higher, and CAS LX 250 or equivalent, or permission of instructor. ]
[Meets with GRS LX 673; Also offered as CAS LF 503; Previously offered as CAS LF 503 "The Structure of French: Phonology"]

CAS LX 422

Intermediate Syntax: Modeling Syntactic Knowledge

A1 Hagstrom TR 11-12:15 TBA
Using linguistic data drawn from a wide variety of languages, students develop a precise model of syntactic knowledge through evaluation of hypotheses and arguments. Exploration of major discoveries and phenomena from the linguistic literature. [Prereq: CAS LX 321/ GRS LX 621 Syntax: Introduction to Sentential Structure (or CAS LX 522) or consent of instructor]
[Meets with GRS LX 722]

CAS LX 432

Intermediate Semantics: The Grammatical Construction of Meaning

A1 Coppock MWF 1:25-2:15 TBA
Introduction to the semantics of natural language at an intermediate level. Topics include (but are not limited to) predication and quantification, scope and anaphora, problems of discourse analysis, various issues at the interface of semantics and pragmatics, and crosslinguistic semantics. [Prereq: CAS LX 331/ GRS LX 631 Semantics & Pragmatics: Introduction to Linguistic Meaning (or CAS LX 502) or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 732; Previously offered as CAS LX 503 "Semantics II"]
 
Related courses at BU
Course number Course title Section Instructor Days Time Room