Fall 2020 (tentative)

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Linguistics courses
Course number Course title Section Instructor Days Time Room

CAS LX 208

The Language of Our Ancestors: Introduction to Indo-European Linguistics

A1 Nikolaev MWF 11:15-12:05 TBA
Surveys ancient and medieval Indo-European languages and cultures. English, Irish, Hindi, Russian, Armenian, and Farsi languages are all related and belong to Indo-European family: they descended from a common ancestor, Proto-Indo-European. The course reconstructs this protolanguage using the historical-comparative method. [Prereq: [none]]
Also offered as CAS CL 208

CAS LX 250

Introduction to Linguistics

A1 Lindsey TR 12:30-1:45 TBA
S1 F 9:05-9:55 TBA
S2 F 10:10-11 TBA
S3 F 11:15-12:05 TBA
S4 F 12:20-1:10 TBA
S5 F 1:25-2:15 TBA
S6 F 2:30-3:20 TBA
S7 F 2:30-3:20 TBA
S8 F 3:35-4:20 TBA
Study of the fundamental properties that all languages share, and of how languages differ, with respect to structure (sound system, word formation, syntax), expression of meaning, acquisition, variation, and change; cultural and artistic uses of languages; comparison of oral, written, and signed languages. [Prereq: none]
  • Students signing up for CAS LX 250 A1 should also sign up for one of the Friday discussion sections.
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas:
    • Scientific Inquiry I
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Critical Thinking

CAS LX 301

Phonetics & Phonology: Introduction to Sound Systems

A1 Lindsey TR 2-3:15 TBA
S1 M 11:15-12:05 TBA
S2 M 2:30-3:20 TBA
S3 M 3:35-4:25 TBA
Introduction to the nature and patterning of sounds in human language. Presents articulatory and acoustic phonetics, and basic phonological analysis, focusing on cross-language typology and comparison. Hands-on development of practical skills, including IPA transcription, field techniques, and digital speech analysis.

Starting in Fall 2020, undergraduates enrolled in CAS LX 301 A1 will also need to register for one of the discussion sections, S1, S2, or S3.

[Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Please note that this course cannot be taken for credit towards the MA or PhD program in Linguistics.]
[Meets with GRS LX 601; Also offered as MET LX 501; Previously offered as CAS LX 510 "Phonetics"]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas:
    • Scientific Inquiry II
    • Quantitative Reasoning I
    • Critical Thinking

CAS LX 321

Syntax: Introduction to Sentential Structure

A1 Hagstrom MWF 11:15-12:05 TBA
S1 R 11:15-12:05 TBA
S2 R 12:30-1:20 TBA
S3 R 5-5:50 TBA
Introduction to syntax as an object of inquiry. Students build an increasingly sophisticated model of syntactic knowledge to account for data from English and other languages, constructing and evaluating alternative hypotheses about how sentence structure works.

Starting in Fall 2020, undergraduates enrolled in CAS LX 321 A1 will also need to register for one of the discussion sections, S1, S2, or S3.

[Prereq: CAS LX 250 Introduction to Linguistics or consent of instructor.
Please note that this course cannot be taken for credit towards the MA or PhD program in Linguistics.]
[Meets with GRS LX 621; Also offered as MET LX 521; Previously offered as CAS LX 522 "Syntax I"]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

CAS LX 367

Indigenous Languages of Latin America

A1 Myler MWF 12:20-1:10 TBA
Exploration of the structure, history, and varieties of indigenous languages of Latin America, and of the communities that speak them. [Prereq: Undergraduate prerequisite: CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor and a First-year Writing Seminar (CAS WR 100 or 120)]
[Meets with GRS LX 667]
  • Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
  • This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas:
    • Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy
    • Writing-Intensive
    • Research and Information Literacy

CAS LX 370

Romance Linguistics

A1 Myler MWF 9:05-9:55 TBA
This course covers sound and morphosyntactic change since Latin, plus various topics in the comparative grammar of modern Romance languages. In addition, there is a module introducing students to the grammatical systems of certain less-studied Romance languages. Students deepen their linguistic knowledge and analytic skills by applying what they have learned in other Linguistics courses to this language family, and learn how data from Romance languages have contributed to our understanding of how language works in general. [Prereq: CAS LX 250 or consent of instructor; PLUS prior study of Latin or a Romance language at the 4th semester level or higher (e.g., CAS LF 212 or CAS LI 212 or CAS LS 212 or CAS LP 212 or equivalent).]
[Meets with GRS LX 670; Previously offered as CAS LX 532 "Romance Linguistics"]

CAS LX 390

Topics in Linguistics: Truth

A1 Coppock MWF 10:10-11 TBA
Approaches the notion of truth through the study of lies and other forms of deception, partial truths, imprecision, subjectivity, bullshit, hustle, and nonsense. Builds on perspectives from linguistics, philosophy, media/communication, law (perjury), and political science (fact-checking). [Prereq: CAS LX 250 or permission of instructor]
[Meets with GRS LX 690]

CAS LX 423

Advanced Syntax: Issues in Modern Syntactic Theory

A1 Hagstrom W 2:30-5:15 TBA
Exploration of advanced topics in syntax, chosen in part based on student interest, through reading and critical discussion of both foundational and recent literature. [Prereq: CAS LX 422 GRS LX 722 Intermediate Syntax (or CAS LX 522) or consent of instructor]
[Meets with GRS LX 723; Previously offered as CAS LX 523 "Syntax II"]

CAS LX 432

Intermediate Semantics: The Grammatical Construction of Meaning

A1 Coppock MWF 1:25-2:15 TBA
Introduction to the semantics of natural language at an intermediate level. Topics include (but are not limited to) predication and quantification, scope and anaphora, problems of discourse analysis, various issues at the interface of semantics and pragmatics, and crosslinguistic semantics. [Prereq: CAS LX 331/ GRS LX 631 Semantics & Pragmatics: Introduction to Linguistic Meaning (or CAS LX 502) or consent of instructor.]
[Meets with GRS LX 732; Previously offered as CAS LX 503 "Semantics II"]
 
Related courses at BU
Course number Course title Section Instructor Days Time Room

CAS AN 524

Seminar: Language and Culture Contacts in Contemporary Africa

A1 Ngom TR 11-12:15 TBA
Concepts and theoretical approaches to study language variation and change in sociolinguistics/linguistic anthropology. This course examines internal and external factors that trigger language variations and changes and the social attitudes associated with them. The nexus between diachronic and synchronic changes will also be reanalyzed in light of the Labovian variationist model. While the course will focus on language variations and changes in Africa, it will draw from existing literature to provide students with a strong foundation on the scholarship in the field of contact linguistics, language variation and change, types of variations, the relationships between these variations and gender, ethnicity, religion, youth culture, and globalization. It will conclude by introducing students to the new field of forensic linguistics (the interface between language, crime and law). Using actual cases from the US and Europe, the use of linguistic features as evidence in criminal investigations, in authorship disputes, and in asylum cases will be examined. The course will consist of lectures and class discussions, practical exercises dealing with issues on language variation and change and their various implications in the 21st century. The course will provide students with the tools necessary to plan and execute studies on language variation and change in the world's speech communities. [Prereq: CAS AN 351 or consent of instructor]

CAS LJ 410

The History of the Japanese Language

A1 Ishikawa MWF 11:15-12:05 TBA
(Conducted in English) Overview of major issues in the history of Japanese: genetic relationships, changes in sound system, word and sentence structures, and pragmatics. Special attention to the process leading to the current writing system. Representative texts used to demonstrate different literary languages. [Prereq: CAS LJ 211.]